What readers are saying about: My Life Hereafter





What readers are saying:

This is a Young Adult / Middle-grade fiction novel that imagines a possible scenario of just what is waiting for us in the afterlife. When young teenager Sunel finds herself and sixty of her former classmates have died, she is initially in a state of shock. To make matters worse, she is the reason the bus crashed. This means she is the reason everyone is dead. As the shock wears off she finds herself in a world that is very similar and yet very different from the one she left behind. My favorite scene is when the teens are led into the Hall of Judgment and are told they will be called in one at at a time. Upon entering the testing room Sunel sees three doors.  "The first door says Recycle. Next to Recycle, there is Rehabilitation. And next to Rehabilitation, there is Rapture." I thought this was very clever. This book touches on many interesting and important topics. It is not often that you find a YA book that openly discusses the afterlife. It seems to be a topic that Young Adult authors do not embrace for some reason, and the few authors who do write about the topic choose ghost story-type tales.  Kudos to Author Lynette Ferreira for tackling such a controversial topic. This book also has elements of other issues important to today's youth such as bullying and peer pressure as well as taking responsibility for one's actions. With the variety of characters, readers should be able to find at least one that they identify with. I think that young teens and middle grade readers will enjoy this book and hopefully it will open up dialogue about the issues detailed in it's pages. 4 star review at  Amie's Book Review Blog

It was just one prank, on top of the many others she had already played in the past. One prank that she hadn't thought through, and caused the ends of many lives. Sunel was on a field trip with many of her classmates when she had the great idea to prank the bus driver. It was supposed to be harmless. Instead, it sent her and the rest of the kids on the bus to a place they hadn't known existed before. MistySpirit - 4 star review at Litpick

She only wanted to play a small prank. She never imagined what the consequences of her actions would be. Sunel is an average teenager that desperately seeks the attention of others. When a seemingly harmless prank goes awry, a school bus driving Sunel and her classmates dives off a cliff. Sunel wakes to a confusing afterlife where she and her classmates must learn not only to forgive each other, but to forgive themselves. jesusfreak - 4-star review at Litpick

This is an original, highly readable examination of life and death, with excellent pacing, and twists which keep the story vital until the very end. The story's protagonist, Sunel, pulls a prank one day on the school bus which plunges herself, and her classmates, into the hereafter, and, subsequently, a journey of self-discovery and realisation. It is a story which makes the reader consider life and its inherent frailty, and is written with great style and thought by the author. Marcia Carrington rated it at Goodreads


There were some very nice descriptions in this book that evoke a mood and various settings. Here is an example I thought was particularly visual. “Giant tears are running down her cheeks and her eyes are puffy and red. The rest of her face has gone pallid white, so now her eyes looks as if they are bleeding.” This book has some serious themes and ideas following on an opening tragedy. Despite that, the tone is somewhat cool and quiet. I owe that to the authors descriptions of the setting and environment the young people first find themselves in. The characters are varied and I think that teens will find someone to identify with. The ending is one that I believe will surprise some, but others may see it coming. I’d say it will hit 50/50. I think this is a book that young adults will enjoy and find creative enough to mention to their friends. I was provided this book free of charge in order to read it and write my honest review of the novel. Lilac Reviews rated it at Goodreads

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. The first few pages had me gripped and I finished it in record time. Sunel and her classmates are on a school outing when the bus they were travelling plummets from a bridge into a river. All the kids realise they are now in heaven. The author's description of everywhere was intriguing. I wanted to read more all the time, so it was difficult to put down. There was also a lot of thought here and the seven deadly sings were all spelt out as the kids were sent into groups. Highly recommended if you want an entertaining read that will leave you thinking. Karen Mossman rated it at Goodreads

This book captured my imagination from the very first sentence. The characters are all together, but they don't know where. The main character Sunel, reveals the story from her perspective. She as the story moves ahead, is quite frankly not a very likeable character. I won't give away any clues, but once it is revealed what she did and why everyone is where they are - it is difficult as a reader to forgive her. However, as Sunel continues on her journey other sides of her personality are revealed and through the love of her friends and inner strength she is able to find redemption. This book also touches on some aspects of bullying, consequences for actions on both sides. Highly recommended! Cathy McGough rated it at Goodreads

What the story is about:

Everything is exactly the same as before that day which she can now only vaguely remember. 

The day her school bus ran over the cliff. 

The day she and most of her fellow students ended up here. 

The twins, Mark and David, were also on the bus, but David did not come here with them. David was sent across the valley to the other side. 


Mark convinces Sunel to help him find his brother, no matter what the dangers might be.


Start reading:

CHAPTER ONE

It is oddly weird.

The one moment I am clutching to the railing of the bus seat in front of me, hanging sideways and upside down simultaneously, with my hair falling over my eyes and then in the blink of an eye I am standing here in this brilliant white hall.
I look around me at the unbelievably high ceiling, the white glimmering tiles all around, stretching into the sky as far as my eyes can see. It looks like an enormous and very clean industrial bathroom. The whiteness of it all hurts my eyes.
Unexpectedly Charlene knocks into me, and whispers reverently, “Is this heaven?”
“I doubt it. Surely, we would see a pearly gate, with hills rolling away into the distance. This looks like a giant railway station.”
“But, we did…”
Lionel joins us. “Wow,” he says, looking around amazed. “Do you believe this?”
I look away from him to a girl I barely know, she is crying softly. Giant tears are running down her cheeks and her eyes are puffy and red. The rest of her face has gone pallid white, so now her eyes look as if they are bleeding.
As a hush falls over the crowd milling around me, I raise my eyebrows at Lionel, silently telling him not to sound so excited.
Every kid on that bus with me, all sixty of us stop talking abruptly, all at the exact same time, and then we turn to face the large stage in the front of this colossal hall.
I see him up on the stage. How can I miss him? He has biceps the size of me. He stands erect, and he lifts his hand to sweep his hair across his brow. His eyes are so blue, I can see the colour all the way at the back here, where I stand.
In a loud booming voice, he says, while my heart skips a beat at the sudden sound, “Welcome. You will form groups of six.”
He stops talking and I assume it is a direct order.
I grab onto Charlene’s arm before someone drags her away from me. Charlene and I have been friends since pre-school and I am not going to go through this hallucination without her.
Lionel inches himself closer to me, and then I lean forward not wanting my legs to move. I tap the sobbing girl on the shoulder. She looks so alone, and my heart goes out to her when I see no-one grabbing onto her.
She looks at me through dew-dropped Bambi lashes.
I suggest, “Join our group. If you want to.”
She smiles shyly as she inches closer to us while keeping her eyes averted. I recognise her, and I think she was in one or two of my classes, but regretfully I cannot really remember her name.
“Okay, that makes four. Quickly get two more kids, before we get split up into other unfinished groups.”
I see Mark sauntering toward us and I quickly scan the surrounding area to see if David is with him as I nudge Charlene in the ribs. Charlene has a serious crush on him, and I must admit he is dangerously handsome. He is not the most popular boy in school, but to Charlene, he is an Adonis.
Mark smiles his sexy smile, and then asks, “Mind if I join your group?”
Charlene gapes at him while I frown. Never before has he spoken to me, Charlene or Lionel, so why would he now walk across the room to connect with us?
Lionel smiles. “Yes, of course. That makes five. We need one more.”
I look around and see the surrounding groups are all full. I start to panic. I do not think I would be able to do this whole afterlife thing without Charlene by my side. I catch my breath. Afterlife? I have not yet had the opportunity to collect my thoughts. Am I dead?

also available in Paperback & Hardcover


Want to leave a comment? Use the social share buttons at the bottom of each post & remember to tag me.

Popular posts from this blog

When we Love: Chapter Nine

Brand New: ForNever: A Shade of Witch (ForNever Series Book 2)